Category Archives: psychiatry 2.0

Big Data: Emerging Narratives?

iStock_000005946607MediumIn a recent TEDx talk at Macquarie University in Australia, Jodie Sangster talks about big data. Mobile data and user generated data on social media are two important sources of big data. Sangster’s message here is simple – big data has a tremendous potential to benefit society. Sangster’s cites a project which investigates the use of social media data to look at outbreaks of Dengue fever.

Big data is not a phenomenon that is restricted to large commercial enterprises. Instead big data is a phenomenon that is transforming society. This transformation is impacting on all areas of life including healthcare. There are two challenges to understanding big data. The first is to recognise where and how this is happening (e.g social media and health related devices). The second challenge is to understand the breadth and depth of change that this will herald.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog. Conflicts of Interest: For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

Can Big Data Solve Big Problems?

Big data is the next big thing. Societies globally are generating vast amounts of data. This data can get covered in the metaphorical layers of dust or else be utilised. Using these vast amounts of data presents novel challenges but is a new frontier for data mining. This applies to areas such as Psychiatry as much as it does for other areas. Dr Philip Parker talks us through some of his innovations in data mining algorithms which turn vast datawarehouses into useful applications. Does this give us insights into the future of medicine?

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Cameron Neylon on Open Science

Scientist Cameron Neylon is an advocate for open science and in this video (from the Open Repositories 2012 conference) he talks about many important aspects of open science. Neylon gives examples of scientific communities that have transformed research methodologies through online networks and accelerated analysis of data in the process. He also looks at the issue of increasing the impact of open science through open science networks. There is a question and answer session at the end.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.