Tag Archives: medline

Working with Pubmed – Part 5: Setting Filters

Medfilters

PubMed* is an extremely useful resource which allows researchers and clinicians to access biomedical databases. The use of PubMed has been discussed elsewhere on this site (see Appendix). Setting up a MyNCBI account allows you to access more features. By accessing the filters site at MyNCBI, the reader is able to get to the filters page (see screenshot). This is a useful feature that lets you set the default for future searches. Returning only research in humans for instance can be useful depending on the nature of the questions being asked.

Appendix – Related Resources on this Site

Working with PubMed – Part 1: Getting started with a shortcut

Working with PubMed – Part 2: Favoriting abstracts

Working with PubMed – Part 3: Bibliography

How to receive research paper e-mail alerts

A Video Celebrating 10 years of PubMed Central

How to improve your search results with Medline

* This article is not affiliated with NCBI

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Working with Pubmed – Part 4: Receiving News Updates on PubMed

PubMed is an impressive resource. There are several ways to learn about using PubMed.

A How To Section: This lists ‘How To’ details for different components of PubMed

A Quick Start Section

A YouTube Channel

NCBI Help Manual

MyNCBI Help: You will need to be logged in to access this feature

Training and Tutorials Section

NCBI News: This is updated periodically and gives a broad overview of developments

NLM Technical Bulletin: This is much broader and relates to the National Library of Medicine. However there are many interesting articles such as this one on the new PubMedReader

Appendix – Related Resources on this Site

Working with PubMed – Part 1: Getting started with a shortcut

Working with PubMed – Part 2: Favoriting abstracts

Working with PubMed – Part 3: Bibliography

How to receive research paper e-mail alerts

A Video Celebrating 10 years of PubMed Central

How to improve your search results with Medline

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Working with Pubmed – Part 3: Bibliography (Updated)

Video Demonstration of My Bibliography Feature

PubMed is a large database of citations maintained by the US National Library of Medicine. You can set up an account with NCBI which I would recommend if your intend to work with NCBI over the longer term. The account is known as a myNCBI lets you do a lot of things you wouldn’t if simply browsing the site. This has been partly covered in previous posts (see Appendix). The video above demonstrates a neat feature of myNCBI which is the ability to store a bibliography. This means that you can select citations of interest and store them in the bibliography. From there you can export to an external database, save as a text file or e-mail them. Using this feature I saved the citation below to the bibliography and e-mailed it to myself before cutting and pasting into this document (changing the format). The bibliography feature is very useful and has many applications.

1: Hietanen H, Pietilä A, Kähönen M, Salomaa V. Ankle blood pressure and dementia: a prospective follow-up study. Blood Press Monit. 2013 Feb;18(1):16-20. doi: 10.1097/MBP.0b013e32835d131c. PubMed PMID: 23275314.


Appendix – Related Resources on this Site

Working with PubMed – Part 1: Getting started with a shortcut

Working with PubMed – Part 2: Favoriting abstracts

How to receive research paper e-mail alerts

A Video Celebrating 10 years of PubMed Central

How to improve your search results with Medline

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.