Book Review: Mild Cognitive Impairment

The featured book is ‘Mild Cognitive Impairment. Aging to Alzheimer’s Disease’ edited by Ronald Petersen. The book brings together a number of experts in different fields to explore the concept of mild cognitive impairment and how this relates to dementia and normal aging. In the first chapter, Petersen reviews the concept of Mild Cognitive Impairment and suggests a grid with the degenerative, vascular, metabolic and traumatic aetiologies versus amnestic MCI, multiple domain MCI and single non-memory domain MCI with the most common being degenerative amnestic MCI. Jeffrey Cummings covers neuropsychiatric symptoms while Glenn Smith and Robert Ivnik cover normative neuropsychology looking at the Mayo Older American Normative Studies (MOANS) that provided normative data on cognition up to the age of 97 and which influenced the revision of related scales such as the WAIS-R. Chapters on biological markers, MRI and functional imaging are covered. There is a particularly detailed chapter by Heiko Braak, Kelly Del Tredici and Eva Braak on the spectrum of pathology in aging and age-related conditions. This is an academic text, covering the relevant studies and presented objectively and therefore provides a useful reference for people interested in Mild Cognitive Impairment, Age Related Cognitive Decline and Dementia. The strength of this book lies in the expertise drawn together and the comprehensive coverage of the main topics.

References

Mild Cognitive Impairment. Aging to Alzheimer’s Disease. Edited by Ronald C Petersen. 2003

Responses

If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk

Disclaimer

The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

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