Daily Archives: February 4, 2017

ICD-5 (Updated 4th February 2017)

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The fifth revision of the original (Bertillon’s) classification of causes of death (but encompassing morbidity also) can be found at the WHO website. The publication is written in French and is 306 pages.

There is a further reference to the fifth revision of the international classification of the causes of death in this article at the WHO website. The conference for the fourth revision was held in 1929.

The publication lists 200 causes of death and morbidity. At the conference it was recommended that there was further study into joint (as opposed to single) causes of death. There was also increasing recognition that many countries had developed and were using their own lists of diseases.

Appendix A – Other Posts in the Series on Health Information Exchanges

A Literature Review of 40 years of SNOMED

Arizona Statewide Health Information Exchange

A History of The Health Information Exchange in Pennsylvania

The Arkansas Health Information Exchange – SHARE

The California Health Information Exchange – Cal Index

Creating a Health Information Exchange in Arizona

Health Information Exchanges

Health Information Exchanges and Chronic Conditions

HIPPA and Health Information Exchanges

ICD-11 and SNOMED CT®

ICD-SNOMED-CT® Harmonisation

ICD-1 – Well…near enough

ICD-2

ICD-3

ICD-4

Körner Data and SNOMED: A Snapshot from 1988

Mapping ICD 9 (or 10) to SNOMED CT®

Over 1 Million Relationships: SNOMED CT ®

Standardisation of Health Information Technology in New Zealand

Statisticians were Responsible for the Development of an International Classification of Diseases

Why Do We Need Electronic Record Systems to Talk to Each Other

Appendix B – Definition of Health Information Exchange

This is the definition of the Health Information Exchange that I use (Hersh et al, 2015)

Health information exchange (HIE), the electronic sharing of clinical information across the boundaries of health care organizations

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

VPs35

Video of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae (see Appendix A for Credits)

VPS35 (Vacuolar Protein Sorting Associated Protein 35) is a protein which is part of the Retromer Complex. This protein is specifically referenced in Small and Duff’s Dual Pathway Hypothesis relating to Alzheimer’s Disease.

I undertook a medline search to find out a little more about it. The earliest papers retrieved by the search (the search term was simply VPS35) dated back to 1992 and there were 243 papers in total.

In this paper, Gerhard Paravicini and colleagues look at the function of VPS35 in mutant strains of yeast – Saccharomyces cerevisiae (see the video above). The vacuoles remain similar in appearance to those in the wild type strains. The authors hypothesise that VPS35 is responsible for processing a subset of the proteins in vacuoles.

As an aside, Saccharomyces Cerevisiae are yeast that are used in brewing beers and wines. They have been intensively study in biological research. Whilst we are very different from these yeast, there is a profound benefit from studying genes and proteins in yeast – the sharing of fundamental biological processes across species. When findings are made in Yeast it offers a biological evidence base for a hypothetical model.

Appendix A

The video is from Dr Alan Cann’s video channel and the MicrobiologyBytes Video Library: http://microbiologybytes.com/video

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.