Category Archives: Illusions

Visual Depth Illusions: Turning 3-D into 2-D

Talented artist Alexa Meade has developed a unique style of painting. Meade’s style utilises objects and people as a canvas and explores the effects of lighting on perception. Meade has appeared in other TED/TEDx videos highlighting other aspects of her work. What I found fascinating about this was that she has removed the subtle lighting effects we see in the face and replaced it with paint to produce effects ranging from pop art to impressionism. When combined with a photograph of the resulting scene, the effect is to remove depth perception  providing the illusion of a 2-dimensional scene. These are opposite in nature to the anamorphic illusions we have seen previously. Therefore visual depth illusions can be classified as either positive – where the illusion increases the apparent depth in a scene or negative as in this case where the illusion decreases the apparent depth in a scene.

Appendix

News Round-Up 2008-2011

News Round-Up 2012

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog. Conflicts of Interest: For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

Could These Findings Explain Some Cases of Delusional Misidentification Syndrome and Visual Illusions?

Associate Professor Josef Parvizi presents the results of his fascinating research which involves recording activity in the brain and correlating this with inner experiences (phenomenology). The findings regarding face recognition have potential applications in the understanding of some of the Delusional Misidentification Syndromes. This is a heterogenous collection of syndromes which in some cases includes a disturbance in face recognition. Parvizi also mentions Pareidolia e.g. seeing faces in clouds.

Video of the Fusiform Gyrus

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.