Category Archives: psychiatry

Our Letter on Smartphones is Published. The BASH study also.

iStock_000043268312_Medium

Dr John Torous has written in response to our article on smartphone mental health applications in the December 2015 issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry Bulletin. The letter and our response has been published in the latest issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry Bulletin. The correspondence focuses on security and efficacy aspects of applications.

The latest issue of the British Journal of Psychiatry Bulletin also features a number of other articles including a study looking at the experiences of medical students – the BASH study. The study looked at how often medical students experienced negative comments about medical specialties and whether this changed their career choices. General practice and Psychiatry received the most negative comments according to the survey results and this is an important paper for medical students and doctors.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

 

 

Mental Health Service Developments in California: A TEDx Talk by Darrell Steinberg

Learning

Darrell Steinberg’s TEDx talk is about his vision of the future of mental health. Darrell Steinberg is a California state senator. Steinberg discusses an early intervention in psychosis program which is being rolled out in California. Here in the UK, there is a lot of experience with early intervention in psychosis (EIP) services and it’s likely that the Californian program will replicate the success seen in the UK and Australia. Steinberg also discusses the issue of mental health in homeless people. Steinberg also talks about parity of mental and physical health. These are important themes that echo some of the discussion about mental health here in the UK.

 

Questions Raised by the Model: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 21

A Model of the Insular Cortex

In the last post we looked at some of the features of the model as it begins to take shape. Could the Insular Cortex act as a transformer in a simple system where physiological responses are translated into emotional experiences in a single part of the brain.

Such a model as it is stated is simple, perhaps too simple and raises a number of questions

1. Does information from physiological responses require more than one step to be transformed into emotional experiences?

2. If a transformative function is required should this occur in just a single location or like many functions would this be distributed?

3. If the Insular Cortex were the only location for this transformation then would that determine many of the anatomical relationships it has with other structures e.g. would it need a direct or indirect connection with all other areas involved in emotional experience or regulation?

4. What constitutes a physiological response? The perception of neutral stimuli in the environment is a physiological response involving the sensory and perceptual apparatus. Do the physiological responses relevant to this discussion have to be characterised?

Related Resources on this Site

Developing a Model of the Insular Cortex and Emotional Regulation: Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 2: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 3: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 2

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 4: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 3

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 5: The Evolution of the Insular Cortex

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 6: A Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 7: The James-Lange Theory

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 8: The Cannon-Bard Thalamic Theory of Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 9: Charles Darwin on the Expression of the Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 10: The Limbic System

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 11: A Second Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 12: GABA receptors and Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 13: GABA receptors and Nematode Worms

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 14: Are GABA Receptors Related to Anxiety in Humans Because Worms Wriggle?

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 15: Another Recap

A Diversion into the Limbic System: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 16

A Look at the Amygdala-PFC Dyad – Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 17

What does the Insular Cortex Do Again?

Insular Cortex Infarction in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Territory Stroke

The Insular Cortex and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

The Relationship of Blood Pressure to Subcortical Lesions

Pathobiology of Visceral Pain

Interoception and the Insular Cortex

A Case of Neurogenic T-Wave Inversion

Video Presentations on a Model of the Insular Cortex

MR Visualisations of the Insula

The Subjective Experience of Pain

How Do You Feel? Interoception: The Sense of the Physiological Condition of the Body

How Do You Feel – Now? The Anterior Insula and Human Awareness

Role of the Insular Cortex in the Modulation of Pain

The Insular Cortex and Frontotemporal Dementia

A Case of Infarct Connecting the Insular Cortex and the Heart

The Insular Cortex: Part of the Brain that Connects Smell and Taste?

Stuttered Swallowing and the Insular Cortex

YouTubing the Insular Cortex (Brodmann Areas 13, 14 and 52)

New Version of Video on Insular Cortex Uploaded

Contributors to the Model (links are to the posts in which contributions were made – these links may contain further links directly to the contributors)

Ann Nonimous

The Neurocritic

Psico-logica

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 20

A Model of the Insular Cortex

In preceding posts we have looked at various models of emotions in the brain which have allowed the contextualisation of a model of the Insular Cortex. Two early and general models of emotions look at the relationship between emotions and physiological responses to stimuli.

There are at least two ways in which this relationship can happen. We sense a stimulus – a spider for example. When we see the spider we experience fear and our heart starts to race. Or else we see the spider and our heart races and we respond with the sense of fear.

In this simplistic model there would need to be a means of transforming information from physiological responses into emotional experiences. In this context we can start with the hypothesis that the Insular Cortex is a transformer. In just the same way we could also argue that the Insular Cortex transmits information from physiological responses or else that it is the location for emotional experiences.

Regardless of whether this is correct or not, this explicit hypothesis enables us to explore the function of the Insular Cortex and also the question of whether information from physiological responses can be converted directly into emotional experiences or whether one or more transformative steps are required.

There are still a few steps before the contextualised model can be stated.

Related Resources on this Site

Developing a Model of the Insular Cortex and Emotional Regulation: Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 2: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 3: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 2

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 4: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 3

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 5: The Evolution of the Insular Cortex

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 6: A Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 7: The James-Lange Theory

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 8: The Cannon-Bard Thalamic Theory of Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 9: Charles Darwin on the Expression of the Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 10: The Limbic System

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 11: A Second Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 12: GABA receptors and Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 13: GABA receptors and Nematode Worms

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 14: Are GABA Receptors Related to Anxiety in Humans Because Worms Wriggle?

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 15: Another Recap

A Diversion into the Limbic System: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 16

A Look at the Amygdala-PFC Dyad – Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 17

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 19

What does the Insular Cortex Do Again?

Insular Cortex Infarction in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Territory Stroke

The Insular Cortex and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

The Relationship of Blood Pressure to Subcortical Lesions

Pathobiology of Visceral Pain

Interoception and the Insular Cortex

A Case of Neurogenic T-Wave Inversion

Video Presentations on a Model of the Insular Cortex

MR Visualisations of the Insula

The Subjective Experience of Pain

How Do You Feel? Interoception: The Sense of the Physiological Condition of the Body

How Do You Feel – Now? The Anterior Insula and Human Awareness

Role of the Insular Cortex in the Modulation of Pain

The Insular Cortex and Frontotemporal Dementia

A Case of Infarct Connecting the Insular Cortex and the Heart

The Insular Cortex: Part of the Brain that Connects Smell and Taste?

Stuttered Swallowing and the Insular Cortex

YouTubing the Insular Cortex (Brodmann Areas 13, 14 and 52)

New Version of Video on Insular Cortex Uploaded

Contributors to the Model (links are to the posts in which contributions were made – these links may contain further links directly to the contributors)

Ann Nonimous

The Neurocritic

Psico-logica

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Returning to the Beginning: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 19

A Model of the Insular Cortex

Almost 5 years ago, we looked at a model of the Insular Cortex that started with a few assumptions from some papers which included one looking at GABA receptors in the Insular Cortex and anxiety. Along the way we looked at works by Antonio Damasio and A.Bud.Craig. More recently we have looked at other areas of the brain implicated in our emotional experiences as well as some of the influential models of the Limbic System.

Returning to the beginning and looking at how to build such a model it seems sensible to contextualise the model in terms of the most influential theories in this area. William James and Carl Lange raised the question of whether we first experience physiological reactions and then emotions whilst in the Cannon-Bard theory the reverse is stated. In either case there is a stated connection between physiological reactions to events and emotions.

These physiological reactions in the body produce information. The process of responding to this information is interoception. The Insular Cortex receives interoceptive input from the body leading to a posited role in interoception. Referring to the discussion above we can see that the Insular Cortex is therefore a natural point of enquiry for exploring the relationship between physiological responses to events and our emotional experiences.

Related Resources on this Site

Developing a Model of the Insular Cortex and Emotional Regulation: Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 2: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 3: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 2

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 4: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 3

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 5: The Evolution of the Insular Cortex

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 6: A Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 7: The James-Lange Theory

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 8: The Cannon-Bard Thalamic Theory of Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 9: Charles Darwin on the Expression of the Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 10: The Limbic System

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 11: A Second Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 12: GABA receptors and Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 13: GABA receptors and Nematode Worms

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 14: Are GABA Receptors Related to Anxiety in Humans Because Worms Wriggle?

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 15: Another Recap

A Diversion into the Limbic System: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 16

A Look at the Amygdala-PFC Dyad – Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 17

What does the Insular Cortex Do Again?

Insular Cortex Infarction in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Territory Stroke

The Insular Cortex and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

The Relationship of Blood Pressure to Subcortical Lesions

Pathobiology of Visceral Pain

Interoception and the Insular Cortex

A Case of Neurogenic T-Wave Inversion

Video Presentations on a Model of the Insular Cortex

MR Visualisations of the Insula

The Subjective Experience of Pain

How Do You Feel? Interoception: The Sense of the Physiological Condition of the Body

How Do You Feel – Now? The Anterior Insula and Human Awareness

Role of the Insular Cortex in the Modulation of Pain

The Insular Cortex and Frontotemporal Dementia

A Case of Infarct Connecting the Insular Cortex and the Heart

The Insular Cortex: Part of the Brain that Connects Smell and Taste?

Stuttered Swallowing and the Insular Cortex

YouTubing the Insular Cortex (Brodmann Areas 13, 14 and 52)

New Version of Video on Insular Cortex Uploaded

Contributors to the Model (links are to the posts in which contributions were made – these links may contain further links directly to the contributors)

Ann Nonimous

The Neurocritic

Psico-logica

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Fear and Love in the Brain – A Look at the Fornix: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 18 (Updated 27.8.13)

A Model of the Insular Cortex

In building a model of the Insular Cortex in emotions it is necessary to first look at the function of other brain regions thought to be involved in emotions. The Fornix is part of the Limbic System, receiving input from the Hippocampus. The Fornix has been suggested to have a role in fear and romantic love.

Fornix

There is a very good review by Thomas and colleagues which looks at the anatomy in health and disease. They comment on the consequences of damage to the Fornix. This pattern mirrors the impairments that result from involvement of other structures including the mamillary bodies in Korsakoff’s Syndrome (this is a syndrome which is associated with persistent excessive alcohol intake but also with insufficient dietary Thiamine intake).

There is a body of literature suggesting that the Fornix is involved in the fear response according to the context and that this fear response is dependent on the theta rhythm in the Hippocampus.

Related Resources on this Site

Developing a Model of the Insular Cortex and Emotional Regulation: Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 2: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 1

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 3: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 2

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 4: Reviewing a Model by Craig – Part 3

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 5: The Evolution of the Insular Cortex

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 6: A Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 7: The James-Lange Theory

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 8: The Cannon-Bard Thalamic Theory of Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 9: Charles Darwin on the Expression of the Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 10: The Limbic System

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 11: A Second Recap

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 12: GABA receptors and Emotions

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 13: GABA receptors and Nematode Worms

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 14: Are GABA Receptors Related to Anxiety in Humans Because Worms Wriggle?

Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 15: Another Recap

A Diversion into the Limbic System: Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 16

A Look at the Amygdala-PFC Dyad – Building a Model of the Insular Cortex – Part 17

What does the Insular Cortex Do Again?

Insular Cortex Infarction in Acute Middle Cerebral Artery Territory Stroke

The Insular Cortex and Neuropsychiatric Disorders

The Relationship of Blood Pressure to Subcortical Lesions

Pathobiology of Visceral Pain

Interoception and the Insular Cortex

A Case of Neurogenic T-Wave Inversion

Video Presentations on a Model of the Insular Cortex

MR Visualisations of the Insula

The Subjective Experience of Pain

How Do You Feel? Interoception: The Sense of the Physiological Condition of the Body

How Do You Feel – Now? The Anterior Insula and Human Awareness

Role of the Insular Cortex in the Modulation of Pain

The Insular Cortex and Frontotemporal Dementia

A Case of Infarct Connecting the Insular Cortex and the Heart

The Insular Cortex: Part of the Brain that Connects Smell and Taste?

Stuttered Swallowing and the Insular Cortex

YouTubing the Insular Cortex (Brodmann Areas 13, 14 and 52)

New Version of Video on Insular Cortex Uploaded

Contributors to the Model (links are to the posts in which contributions were made – these links may contain further links directly to the contributors)

Ann Nonimous

The Neurocritic

Psico-logica

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Refining the Definition of Automatic Speech in the Three Structure Model – Part 4. Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 16

reviseddescriptionofspeechinthreestructuremodel

In previous posts, we’ve looked at Automatic Speech in the three structure model. Just to summarise automatic speech is absolute unconscious activity. The neural activity that results in automatic speech can never result in conscious experience. I wanted to introduce another concept into the discussion – that of choice. In the previous post we looked at fMRI data with superimposed audio showing how speech is produced in real time.

The example was used in a thought experiment to show how each component of speech could at a sufficiently slow rate result from a conscious decision. Therefore in moving forwards my proposal is that automatic speech is that speech beyond conscious control, where the decision to initiate that component of speech is irreversible. By corollary conscious speech components retain an element of reversibility – the final speech output whilst conceived, does not have to take place. Transient conscious activity exists in two forms – with and without choice.

Looking at speech in this way also allows generalisation to upstream parts of the model. Instead of talking about speech we can talk about conscious experience, transient conscious activity and absolute unconscious activity in relation to decision making. If it is valid to use induction then we can say that conscious experience allows the individual to retain choice about actions, transient conscious activity is intermediate – in its essential form choice is removed. However the neural structures underpinning transient conscious activity are capable of manifesting conscious experience and are thereby capable of choice.

Choice/decision making here links in with locus of control and volition/will. The model values the individual actor rather than the elaborate reflexes of behaviourism or the reductionism of biological determinism or some combination thereof. That is not to say that such models are mutually exclusive for it is entirely possible that the intuitive appeal of volition can be expressed in terms of the other models in a way that retains the essence of each.

Appendix – Related Resources on the TAWOP Site

In Support of Method

A Review of the Structure of Scientific Revolutions

An Interpretation of Scientific Revolutions

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 1

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 2

Integration in Neuroscience:A Core Problem – Part 3

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 4: A Language for Mind and Brain?

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 5: A Three Structure Model

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 6: Reflection on the Three Structure Model

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 7: The Unconscious in the Three Structure Model

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 8

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 9

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 10

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 11

Integration in Neuroscience: A Core Problem – Part 12

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link. Podcast: You can listen to this post on Odiogo by clicking on this link (there may be a small delay between publishing of the blog article and the availability of the podcast). It is available for a limited period. TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link. Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk. Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.