Standardisation of Health Information Technology in New Zealand

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Park and Atalag have written a review of the standardisation of healthcare information systems in New Zealand. Along the way they discuss standards that are being used in other countries including the USA and the UK. They reference the various agencies in different countries with responsibility for standards.

The authors then focus on the New Zealand healthcare system and give a very helpful overview together with the national standards (HISO 10040.1, 10040.2, 10040.3) that have being developed and which utilise HL7. They also reference the endorsement of SNOMED CT with standard status.

This is a very useful overview both for standards in different countries as well as a detailed overview of the development of standards in New Zealand and this can be used in comparison with the developments in other countries.

Appendix A – Other Posts in the Series on Health Information Exchanges

Arizona Statewide Health Information Exchange

A History of The Health Information Exchange in Pennsylvania

The Arkansas Health Information Exchange – SHARE

The California Health Information Exchange – Cal Index

Health Information Exchanges

Health Information Exchanges and Chronic Conditions

HIPPA and Health Information Exchanges

Creating a Health Information Exchange in Arizona

Why Do We Need Electronic Record Systems to Talk to Each Other

Appendix B – Definition of Health Information Exchange

This is the definition of the Health Information Exchange that I use (Hersh et al, 2015)

Health information exchange (HIE), the electronic sharing of clinical information across the boundaries of health care organizations‘.

Appendix C – Full Citation

Healthc Inform Res. 2015 Jul;21(3):144-51. doi: 10.4258/hir.2015.21.3.144. Epub
2015 Jul 31.

Current National Approach to Healthcare ICT Standardization: Focus on Progress in
New Zealand.

Park YT, Atalag.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

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Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

Evidence for Bioactivity of Virgin Olive Oil

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Parkinson and Cicerale review possible biological mechanisms of action of Virgin Olive Oil in this open access article (Creative Commons by 4.0).

They reference a reported ancient tradition in the use of Virgin Olive Oil

Hippocrates mentions approximately 60 health conditions where VOO use can be beneficial

The authors reference the Seven Countries Study and outline many constituents of olive oil including

phenolic acids, phenolic alcohols, secoiridoids, hydroxy-isocromans, flavonoids and lignans

Much of the research they reference has been undertaken on the phenolics and the authors look at studies which have investigated the bioavailability of these compounds.

The authors reference studies investigating the relationship of these compounds to physiological and pathological processes. Many of the studies are in vitro.

The authors discuss the limitations of the studies. There is variation in the constituents of olive oil products, in vitro studies do not necessarily translate into in vivo studies and there is a complex interaction between constituents of the food matrix.

Nevertheless a valuable function of the review is to identify models of how olive oil may act biologically and such models can be combined with epidemiological data to generate hypotheses for testing.

I found table 1 to be particularly interesting as it references some of the in vitro work that has been done around neurofibrillary tangles. Neurofibrillary tangles are central to key models of Alzheimer’s Disease. The authors also look at some of the in vitro studies of inflammation and atherosclerosis.

The authors have provided a detailed and useful overview of the literature in this area which can support the development of pathophysiological models in a range of conditions.

Appendix – Full Citation

Parkinson L, Cicerale S. The Health Benefiting Mechanisms of Virgin Olive Oil
Phenolic Compounds. Molecules. 2016 Dec 16;21(12). pii: E1734. doi: 10.3390/molecules21121734. Review. PubMed PMID: 27999296.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

 

Why Do We Need Electronic Patient Record Systems To Talk To Each Other?

Why do we need electronic patient record (EPR) systems to talk to each other?

Dr Harry Greenspun is director of Deloitte Center for Health Systems. In this talk from 2015 he gives a very nice overview of where EPR’s have come from and where they are going to. The future he describes holds not just exchange of information between systems but also data analytics and personalised medicine.

Appendix A – Other Posts in the Series on Health Information Exchanges

Arizona Statewide Health Information Exchange

A History of The Health Information Exchange in Pennsylvania

The Arkansas Health Information Exchange – SHARE

The California Health Information Exchange – Cal Index

Health Information Exchanges

Health Information Exchanges and Chronic Conditions

HIPPA and Health Information Exchanges

Creating a Health Information Exchange in Arizona

Appendix B – Definition of Health Information Exchange

This is the definition of the Health Information Exchange that I use (Hersh et al, 2015)

Health information exchange (HIE), the electronic sharing of clinical information across the boundaries of health care organizations‘.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

 

 

Exercising Through the Week Versus At Weekends

HiRes

There is a recent study which looked at the health benefits of exercising through the week versus at weekends.

I’m particularly interested in exercising from the perspective of cognition and Dementia but there are always important discussions around the relationship with broader health issues. This is one such study.

The question asked here is whether people can get the health benefits from exercising just at weekends or else through the week. From a more practical perspective I wonder if it’s easier to maintain a habit if it’s done consistently rather than intermittently.

The four groups that the researchers investigated where

(a) Those that were inactive

(b) Those that exercised more than the threshold of 150 minutes of moderate intensity physical activity per week or 75 minutes of high intensity physical activity per week but in 3 or more sessions per week

(c) Those that exercised less than the recommended limits for moderate and high intensity physical activity

d) Those that exceeded 150 minutes of moderate physical activity or 75 minutes of high intensity physical activity in 2 sessions through the week

I don’t need to go through the details here because all the hard work of explaining it has been done really well in this NHS Choices article.

Compared to the other three groups, the inactive group had a large increase in the number of deaths from all causes. The two groups (b) and (c) had lower mortality from all causes, cardiovascular disease and cancer compared to the inactive group. Group (d) had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease and all causes compared to the inactive group.

The authors identify the limitations of the study but there is some evidence here for differences in health benefits according to the frequency of exercise. There is also a challenge in the data to explain the apparent benefits of group (c) – whether this is an artefact of the methodology or will be replicated elsewhere.

 

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

 

 

 

 

 

A History of The Health Information Exchange in Pennsylvania

There is a very informative video about the development of a health information exchange in Pennsylvania. The video explains how the health information exchange was conceptualised and supported by the development of state law leading to an independent authority with stakeholder representation. I was impressed by the sophisticated networking and collaboration that led to a technological solution to important clinical problems whilst also solving the more subtle challenges.

Appendix A – Other Posts in the Series on Health Information Exchanges

Arizona Statewide Health Information Exchange

The Arkansas Health Information Exchange – SHARE

The California Health Information Exchange – Cal Index

Health Information Exchanges

Health Information Exchanges and Chronic Conditions

HIPPA and Health Information Exchanges

Creating a Health Information Exchange in Arizona

Appendix B – Definition of Health Information Exchange

This is the definition of the Health Information Exchange that I use (Hersh et al, 2015)

Health information exchange (HIE), the electronic sharing of clinical information across the boundaries of health care organizations‘.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.

 

 

 

There Are Many Mediterranean Diets: An Australian Perspective

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The researchers in this Australian study interviewed 102 people of Mediterranean origin about their diet and also observed their food preparation techniques. The researchers grouped the diets into Western, Eastern, North African and Adriatic groups and detailed the components of the diets. They also cross-checked their findings with a number of diet books from different countries.

What I found particularly interesting was a reference to earlier literature referencing a wide variation in individual components of the diet between countries. For example there was four fold difference in fruit consumption between the highest and lowest consuming groups as well as a four-fold difference in vegetable consumption. The authors also reference differences in life expectancy between the countries.

The results of the present study are summarised in Tables 1 and 2 which identify both the frequency of consumption of the diet as well as the components of the diet. The components of the diet detailed here range from Melokhia and Okra through to Focaccia and preserved Walnut. The researchers identified similar diets in neighbouring countries and increasing differences with geographical separation.

This is a detailed study looking at differences in the Mediterranean diet across the Mediterranean region. There is also a reference to the literature for further reading.

Appendix A – Full Citation

Asia Pac J Clin Nutr. 2001;10(1):2-9. There are many Mediterranean diets. Noah A(1), Truswell AS.

Index: There are indices for the TAWOP site here and here

Twitter: You can follow ‘The Amazing World of Psychiatry’ Twitter by clicking on this link.

TAWOP Channel: You can follow the TAWOP Channel on YouTube by clicking on this link.

Responses: If you have any comments, you can leave them below or alternatively e-mail justinmarley17@yahoo.co.uk.

Disclaimer: The comments made here represent the opinions of the author and do not represent the profession or any body/organisation. The comments made here are not meant as a source of medical advice and those seeking medical advice are advised to consult with their own doctor. The author is not responsible for the contents of any external sites that are linked to in this blog.

Conflicts of Interest: *For potential conflicts of interest please see the About section.